Saturday, October 18, 2014

Not as Young as I Use to Be

My hubby and I built a house together twelve years ago. At the time he had a 7-5 job and I was still trying to get published.  During the day while he was at his day job, I'd take care of the chores(we had cattle then) write in the morning, and go to the new house and either do clean up(from the night before) or paint, or lay tile or do whatever job I could. I'd go back to the mobile home and make dinner. Hubby would come home eat, and then we'd go work on the new house until 11pm or midnight. And get up the next day and do it all over again. That house was larger, two-story, and more daunting than the one we are building now.

But this time he doesn't have a job that is so demanding. He's the manager of an alfalfa ranch across the fence from us and right now it takes up very little of his time. So he has all day to work on our new house. And I am a published author and need my computer time to either write, get books uploaded, or take care of promotion. So he works on the house all day and I join him at noon and we work till dinner and call it quits.

We're finding in between the twelve years that we last did this task, we have both slowed down. We still have grand dreams, it just takes longer to get them done!

Those of you who read my last blog, the buffet is still in need of my attention to make it into a vanity. It's not from my not wanting to work on it, it's from a lack of place to do the work. The garage door hasn't arrived yet and that is where I'll have to do the magic. So until the garage door arrives and I can get to work on the vanity, I'm staining the wood front and back doors and painting the fascia on the house. Soon I'll start staining the tongue and groove that will go on the vaulted ceiling. There is always something to do when building a house.

Stay tuned. I'll be starting the walk-in shower project this weekend and will give you step by step photos as that progresses.

Monday, October 13, 2014

Triumph and Treasure with Collette Cameron


Triumph and Treasure
Book I in the Highland Heather Romancing a Scot Series

A disillusioned Scottish gentlewoman.
Angelina Ellsworth once believed in love—before she discovered her husband of mere hours was a slave-trader and already married. To avoid the scandal and disgrace, she escapes to her aunt and uncle’s, the Duke and Duchess of Waterford. When Angelina learns she is with child, she vows she’ll never trust a man again.

A privileged English lord.
Flynn, Earl of Luxmoore, led an enchanted life until his father committed suicide after losing everything to Waterford in a wager. Stripped of all but his title, Flynn is thrust into the role of marquis as well as provider for his disabled sister and invalid mother. Unable to pay his father’s astronomical gambling loss, Flynn must choose between social or financial ruin.

When the duke suggests he’ll forgive the debt if Flynn marries his niece, Flynn accepts the duke’s proposal. Reluctant to wed a stranger, but willing to do anything to protect her babe and escape the clutches of the madman who still pursues her, Angelina agrees to the union. Can Flynn and Angelina find happiness and love in a marriage neither wanted, or is the chasm between them insurmountable? 

Bio:
Award winning, Amazon best-selling author, Collette Cameron, has a BS in Liberal Studies and a Master's in Teaching. Author of the Castle Brides Series and Highland Heather Romancing a Scot Series, Collette writes Regency and Scottish historicals and makes her home in the Pacific Northwest with her husband and five mini dachshunds. Mother to three and a self-proclaimed Cadbury Chocolate chocoholic, Collette loves a good joke, inspirational quotes, flowers, trivia, and all things shabby chic. You'll always find dogs, birds, quirky—sometimes naughty—humor, and a dash of inspiration in her novels. Her motto for life? You can’t have too much chocolate, too many hugs, or too many flowers. She’s thinking about adding shoes to that list.


Connect with Collette

Website: http://collettecameron.com
Blue Rose Romance Blog: http://blueroseromance.com
Twitter: http://twitter.com/collette_author
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7047979.Collette_Cameron
You can connect with her on LinkedIn and Google+ too.
Just head to her website for the links.





Tuesday, October 07, 2014

Measurements to Run-on Sentences

We built a house eleven years ago. At the time I wasn't a published author. I spent hours working on the house and the writing was something I did on the days there wasn't a task I could do by myself while my hubby was at his day job.

We are again building a house. This time around, I have deadlines to get books written and published. What a difference it makes trying to find priorities!

The hope is to be in the new house by December first. The drawbacks have been supplies not showing up on time and we are eleven years older and not willing to put in the long hours we did the last time.
The house to this point.

What I have discovered is that planning a house is a lot like writing a book. We called upon a man who does cement for a living to do the foundation of our house.  Having someone who has been doing it for a living for years and knows all the tricks will give our h


ouse a better foundation. In writing you have to start with a plausible plot to be the foundation of a story.

We did the grunt work of digging, filling in, and helping when the cement was poured. My hubby and I both have control issues. ;) We like to know our house is being done to our standards.

After all the cement was poured. The framers came in. while they were framing the house and making things square and easy for us to do the finish work, we were digging and putting in the septic system.  We prefer using sweat equity to doling out dollars.

The frame work on a house equates to the character building for a story as well as putting the character's goals, motivations, and conflicts in order so a logical story can be written.

The house was framed and ready for us to take over in two weeks. Since then we've made trips to gather toilets, a batch tub, sinks, lights, electrical supplies and other necessities to finishing out a house.

By our timeline the metal roof should have been on by now but the day we planned to pick it up at the lumber place, they called to say it didn't come in. It is supposed to be in tomorrow. We have our fingers crossed that over the weekend we get the roof on. We also have inspectors coming tomorrow to check out the plumbing.

Old buffet I'm making into a bathroom vanity.
The things we will be doing to finish the house is the same as writing a story. Once you have the plot, the character, his goals, motivation, and conflicts, the story is prettied up with eloquent phrasing, setting, and the plot and GMC linked together.

The finishing of a house is painting, finding the right lighting, adding tile or wood, the flooring and the molding around the doors a windows. The inspectors are like critique partners helping with the story along the way and the final inspector is the editor who helps make the story the best it can be.

Friday, September 26, 2014

Jazz and Mystery the Perfect Combination (SinC-up Blog Hop)#SinC-up

When I responded to a fellow Sisters in Crime member to partner with her for a “SinC-up blog hop", I didn’t realize we would have a writing trait in common other than we both write mysteries. It turns out we also like to listen to music when we write. You can read H.A. Somerled’s blog on writing with music here. And learn about her books here.

I’ve talked about how music has helped me get in character and dropped me into a deeper POV while writing. I listen to Native American drum and flute music as well as music by Karen Therese while writing the Spirit trilogy—three historical books set among the Nez Perce. 



While writing the Action Adventure books, I listened to first Guatemalan music while Isabella Mumphrey, the heroine, was in Guatemala, then Mexican music when she was in Mexico City, and Native American music when she found adventure in Arizona while tracking down a Hopi ceremonial kiva.

Now that I’m working on a mystery, I listen to jazz. My amateur sleuth is half Nez Perce, so why don’t I listen to Native American music, you might ask. Simply because Jazz lends itself to mysteries.
 
As a junior in high school I attended a Jazz music summer camp. At that camp we learned that you not only have to learn the song’s melody and rhythm, but you have to make up your own rendition of the melody when it’s your instruments turn to solo.

So, like a mystery story that starts out with the standard structure: someone is killed, sleuths-amateur or professional or both try to solve the murder, and there is a twist at the end, a jazz song also has the fundamentals of the song that everyone knows and adheres to. But then, like a jazz song has improvisation by several different instruments, the author gets to improvise by leading readers into what if’s and red herrings to take them on a ride of suspense, just like the instruments in a jazz song take the listener on a journey with their unique spins on the melody.

Jazz songs have emotion and melody. They have soft and hard. All the aspects that need to be hit in a mystery as it is being written and read.

And that’s why I listen to jazz while writing mystery.

Have you ever connected a song or artist with a book you read?